MID-WEEK REPORT: THE LATEST NEWS, PRODUCTS AND EVENTS

Take a look at the best of our trending stories from this week October 13, about the latest road bikes, tech, pro racing and more in the cycling industry.

BRAKING TECHNIQUES TO MAKE YOU FASTER 

Science doesn’t often make discoveries completely out of the blue. Many times, science confirms what we already know and provides insights into how something works. Training with power is one example, and now we can add braking power!

Before the cycling power meter existed, we knew intuitively that more power was a good thing, and we knew fundamentally how to increase power output with training. The power meter quantified that intuition and allowed coaches and athletes to become far more precise in how we train to maximize power production. 

Where the crank-, hub- or pedal-based power meter offers insight into how a cyclist produces power for
propulsion, the braking power meter measures the force used for braking, duration of braking and the angular velocity of the wheel. With these measurements you can calculate braking power and braking work in joules. Essentially, you’re using the exact same measurements as a propulsion power meter but applied to a disc brake rotor. 

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WATCH: SEA OTTER CLASSIC TECH PART 1

After being cancelled in 2020 and then postponed earlier this spring, the Sea Otter Classic came storming back to Laguna Seca Raceway in Monterey, California. Yes, there were fewer expo tents than normal (rumored to be down by upwards of 500), and yes, fewer racers, but even as early as Thursday morning the crowds have been impressive  – being around bicycles is still a good time!

Given the Sea Otter’s founding legacy as a mountain bike event, the amount of flat bar technology on display far outnumbered the drop bar offerings. Still, we searched out what we could to get a taste of some of the latest road/gravel bike technology,

Here’s our video report highlighting what we found over at the Look Cycles booth that was chock full of carbon finery, followed by some Q&A with former national road champ Meredith Miller who is now in charge of road sports marketing for Shimano.

MORE SEA OTTER TECH

 

WATCH: LAEL WILCOX TAKES ON THE TOUR DIVIDE

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HOW AND WHERE TO PACK YOUR BAGS

Q: Between the pandemic and my newfound love for unpaved roads that I had never contemplated riding, I need to carry more stuff on my rides. I’m considering a bag of some sort. What are your thoughts on location, bars, frame, saddle, maybe even a rack?

When it comes to on-bike supplies, I normally go a bit overboard and carry too much. With that said, I have pared down and no longer take two of everything. When it comes to storing, I like to split things up a bit. I have my repair bag, which has a multi-tool, tubes, lever, valve core tool, tire boot, patch kit and CO2. You want this bag to be tight, meaning you don’t want things to have room to move. If they move, they make noise, and it can wear a hole in a spare tube. I normally run this bag under the saddle.

Now, when it comes to the extras, like food, water, clothing and whatever else, I’d say behind the head tube is the key. Burrito bags are convenient if you don’t want to stop but still reach things, just keep them small. You want to minimize the weight on the front end. It affects handling, and even a little can change things a lot. I only run one if it’s small with a few snacks. This is a great alternative to stuffing a jersey pocket full. I prefer the top tube bag for a few at-speed snacks.

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TARMAC SL7 RECALLED

Tour de France 2021 – Julian Alaphilippe (FRA – Deceuninck – Quick-Step) 

If you’re one of the many cyclists who aspired to look and feel like two-time world champion Julian Alaphilippe and purchased a Specialized Tarmac SL 7, you should quit riding the bike as Specialized has just announced a recall of their high-end Tarmac road bike. Apparently “harsh impacts may put extraordinary stress on headset components and may initiate a crack in the fork’s steerer tube.”

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BIKE OF THE WEEK: SAGE STORM KING GP

We have been working with Sage for a few months now on a pretty sweet project bike, the Storm King GP. The titanium gravel bike has a suspension-corrected geometry as well as a more slack seat tube angle to correct for the zero offset Reverb AXS dropper post. The bike is built with the new SRAM XPLR line, check out the video below.

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