MID-WEEK REPORT: THE LATEST NEWS, PRODUCTS AND EVENTS

Welcome to the October 14th, Mid-Week Report!
Welcome to the October 14th, Mid-Week Report!

 

PHOTO OF THE WEEK: GUESS WHO’S BACK

Giro d’Italia 2020 – 103rdEdition – Peter Sagan (SVK – Bora – Hansgrohe)

Peter Sagan soloed to victory in the 10th stage of the coronavirus-hit Giro d’Italia on Tuesday with Portugal’s Joao Almeida holding the leader’s pink jersey.

Sagan positioned himself in the early breakaway. Twelve kilometers from the finish Sagan attacked the lead group including former race leader Filippo Ganna and third place overall Pello Bilbao.

Sagan pushed his gap to 20 seconds and held off the charging chase group of GC contenders. It is Sagan’s first win at the Giro, which completed his attempt at a stage win in every Grand Tour.

More Racing News

WORKOUT WEDNESDAY: 6 REASONS TO CROSS-TRAIN

By Chris Carmichael Founder/Head Coach of CTS

This is the time of year when a lot of athletes ask about strength training. Should they? Shouldn’t they? Should they lift heavy or light? Free weights or machines? And what about Crossfit? Coaches have been debating the effectiveness and necessity of strength training for endurance athletes for many years, and even my own view has evolved considerably. Ten years ago I would have told you that if you’re a cyclist, strength training is a waste of time and effort. Not anymore.

We’re Not Getting Any Younger

Any conversation about strength training for endurance athletes requires some parameters of who you’re talking about. It is still difficult to make a compelling case for elite and professional road cyclists or even 30-something high-level Masters to spend significant periods of time lifting weights. The vast majority of the athletes working with CTS Coaches and reading this blog are 35-65 years old, have full-time jobs or are retired, and have athletic aspirations that do not include National Championships or a pro contract. For this population – and I am one of you – strength training should be a component of your year-round training. That’s one of the reasons strength training plans are included in the Trainright Membership, and incorporated into personal training plans for people working directly with CTS Coaches.

CONTINUE READING

MORE TRAINING TIPS

THIS JUST IN: NEW BIKES

FIRST RIDE: SPECIALIZED AETHOS

It seems that the crew at Specialized have been hard at work, they just released an all-new model, the Aethos, a lightweight (sub-700 gram frame) option that replaces the Tarmac as the Morgan Hill-based brand’s lightest road bike. Specialized has famously said aero is everything, just check out their latest iteration of the Tarmac, but from the looks of it they realized that not everyone puts aero on their priority list and the result is the Aethos. This isn’t to say the Aethos is huge steps back aerodynamically, but it moves the priority of aero further down the list. We opted for a frameset instead of a complete build and paired it with some of our favorite components. While this route is rarely less expensive it delivers a more personalized ride.

Weight and Build

The Aethos is maybe the lightest disc frame we have seen and our size 54 frame hit the scales at 622 grams. The fork is 311 grams for a total weight of 933 grams. Specialized continues to remind us that this bike is not up to legal UCI weight even though it has a UCI sticker. Speaking for the vast majority, who cares? We have yet to be restricted in our events by the arbitrary rules that the UCI places on the elite few that race their events.

Our frame is one of the stock painted options and Specialized says there are options that have reduced paint and hit the scales a few grams less. When you add in the 153 grams worth of small parts and the 150-gram Roval seatpost we have a starting weight of 1236 grams or 2.72 pounds.

CONTINUE READING

FIRST RIDE: CANYON AEROAD CFR

Just a tad over 24 hours ago the cycling world was made aware of a new Canyon Aeroad, their first re-issue of the bike since it first appeared back in 2014 – check out our “First Look” of the Canyon Aeroad. This new model year bike is home to some really novel engineering feats, key among them an adjustable width/height handlebar/stem combo, the former maintaining Canyon’s curious attention to unique handlebar designs (in mind the duo-plane design found on their Grail gravel bike).

What we have here is our first ride review  from the weekend of riding that we got in after we brough the bike home.  Doing the duties for this first ride review is longtime RBA test rider and actual NASA type engineer, Scott Evans. All you need t know about Scotty is that he is highly proficient all two wheels; road, track and gravel.

THE AEROAD DETAILS

There is a longstanding joke often used in engineering circles where you are given three desirable qualities that are at least partially in conflict with one another. As an example, imagine choosing  a chicken burrito where your options are either: 1. big, 2. cheap, or 3. delicious and you can only choose two.  Now we’re sure  that, like us, you would find having to choose 2 of those 3 to be a real predicament. What does a delicious chicken burrito have to do with a high-zoot, latest & greatest  aero road bike from Germany you ask?!  Simple, with with the Canyon Aeroad the choice is between 1. aerodynamic, 2. light, or 3. compliant. The difference here is that you can actually chose all three.

For a while there we thought the bike industry would fall into the equilibrium carved out by the Trek Emonda and Specialized SL7: more aero but not totally in order to save weight. A compromise. Somehow it seems the Canyon came up with a much more aerodynamic setup with virtually no weight penalty…and an excellent ride quality to boot.

There are innovations that I think will carry forward but need another iteration before really being ready for primetime…

CONTINUE READING

WIN A 3T EXPLORO RACEMAX

CLICK HERE FOR MORE INFO

 

racingCTSnewsmid week report2020October